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Discover the Animal that Hides in your Heart . . .

Framed Chinese Zodiac PostersThe Chinese lunar calendar is the longest chronological record in history. Since 2637 B.C., each year has been named after one of twelve animals in the Zodiac—which simply means circle of animals. In order they are the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig. The cycle repeats itself every dozen years. Since each year is also assigned an element—Metal, Water, Wood, Fire or Earth—five twelve-year cycles comprise one full cycle. We began the seventy-seventh cycle on February 1, 1984.

Time has clouded the details of how the animals were chosen. The most popular legend is that Lord Buddha asked all the animals to pay their final respects before he left Earth. Only twelve came, and he rewarded them by naming a year after each in the order they arrived. Variations of the tale suggest that the animals knowingly competed for these positions of honor.

These signed and numbered, limited edition posters are available as 10H” x 16” giclée prints on watercolor paper for $50. Each poster highlights the animal’s characteristics, years, compatible signs, and incompatible signs. They make a unique and affordable baby, birthday, or wedding gift, and are a striking addition to any home.

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One traditional view of the Chinese calendar is that being born in the year of a particular animal will influence your life. It has been said, “this is the animal that hides in your heart.” While this view Find your Chinese Zodiac Signholds that everyone born in the same year has the same personality, people’s fundamental personalities are further shaped by such variables as the hour of birth, the element of birth (Metal Water, etc.) and month of birth.

The Chinese New Year begins at the appearance of the second new moon after Winter Solstice. Consequently Chinese years begin and end on different dates of the Gregorian calendar each year, as opposed to January 1 every year. If you were born in January or February, you need to check carefully to see which animal sign belongs to you. For instance, if you were born in 1970, chances are you are a Dog. But if you were born before February 6, you are actually a Rooster.

Those who read Chinese will probably notice the Chinese characters refer to the names of the animals rather than to the Earth Branches. Although both uses appear to be correct, the animal name is more universal.

 

Chinese Calendar and Signs